A show named Tango Argentino   2 comments

A show named Tango Argentino

The current revival of the tango spread with blazing intensity, thanks to the globalization of communications. It started to rise around 1990, after 30 years of no major tango activity, with the unexpected success of a musical revue aptly named Tango Argentino. Producers Claudio Segovia and Héctor Orezzoli synthesized all the implicit dramatic qualities of the tango on the stage. They focused on the taciturn man of Buenos Aires (who is secretly idealistic with a devastating sense of humor) and the seductive Buenos Aires woman (who is alluring and drop-dead elegant). But it was the performance of the dancing couples that captivated the public’s imagination, reintroducing a dance in which the man flaunted his masculinity and the couples embraced each other in a sensual ritual full of irresistible beauty.

This week, 30 years ago, Tango Argentino appeared for the first time on an international stage at the Paris Autumn Festival, which began on November 11, 1983. That run lasted one week, but those few days were enough to change history: the tango as dance resurfaced with an unexpected force, and became huge around the world. There has never been a time in history when so many social dancers are dancing Argentine tango as it was danced in the golden years of the 1940s and ’50s.

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Posted November 14, 2013 by Alberto & Valorie in EDITORIAL

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2 responses to “A show named Tango Argentino

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  1. This was about the time that I got into AT. Wow! 30 years! It all goes by in such a flash. A not so gentle reminder to strive at every moment to be the very best person whom you can be in every aspect of life, and in every precious moment given us. Tango helped.

    • That is amazing. That is 1983.
      You got into AT before there was Argentine tango outside Buenos Aires, and way before the ballroom crowd began to call Argentine tango AT trying to make it the eleventh dance of the ballroom circuit.
      That’s Wikipedia material…

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